Dillon Francis: Money Sucks, Friends Rule

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Posted November 7, 2014 by in Dance pop
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Rating

Overall
 
 
 
 
 

2.5/ 5

Details

Genre: ,
 
Producer: , , , , , , , ,
 
Label: ,
 
 
 
 
Genre: Electronica, dance-pop, synthpop
 
Producer: Ammo, Billboard, The Cataracs, Dillon Francis, Martin Garrix, Major Lazer, Oligee, DJ Snake, Sultan + Ned Shepard, TJR
 
Label: Mad Decent, Columbia
 
Format: Digital download, compact disc
 
Time: 45:22
 
Release Date: 27 October 2014
 
Spin This: "When We Were Young," "Drunk All the Time"
 

Pros:

Francis isn't afraid to test the waters of EDM madness
 

Cons:

More often the songs lack organization, pop readiness
 

Youngblood moobahcore DJ surrounds himself around heavyweight stars, diverse dance sounds

by J Matthew Cobb
Full Article

Youngblood moobahcore DJ surrounds himself around heavyweight stars, diverse dance sounds

Dillon Francis, a protégé of Diplo, has been churning out EPs since 2010. Now signed to Columbia, the young L.A-bred DJ is finally jumping into the spotlight with his debut full-length LP. Francis has a bit of edge on his profile since he’s touted for helping to break the house-reggaeton fusion styles of moombahton and moobahcore style on EDM culture. He uses it to his advantage on Money Sucks, Friends Rule, kicking off the disc with Twista’s lightning-speed prose on a rollicking bass ‘n synth driven “All That” and continuing that momentum with “Not Butter.”  But Francis is on a mission to prove he’s a bearer of a Technicolor dreamcoat by trying on various styles inside the EDM universe. “When We Were Young,” led by the Chain Gang of 1974, takes off using electro pop confetti and a delicious disco strut. It’s probably the album’s most accessible track, but “Drunk All the Time” is clearly Francis’s frontrunner. It’s heavy with flavor and a riveting dance-pop appeal, comparable to this season’s standout EDM winner – Basement Jaxx’s “Never Say Never.” The futuristic robotic chants behind Simon Lord’s Boy George-drenched vocals are neatly placed, giving off a natural satisfaction that comes with classic disco workouts.  The disc is also a star-studded fest, decorated with DJ Snake, Stylo and Major Lazer of “Pon De Floor” fame. Panic! at the Disco’s Brendon Urie even joins in on “Love in the Middle of a Firefight,” a tune that sounds like remnants of the Killers’ balladry.

Other tracks sound off properly, but are hardly radio-accessible, lacking the necessary climaxes and memorable finesse of pop royalty. Bollywood sounds, old school rap tricks and James Brown chants highlight “Get Low,” but sounds more like a hi-gloss demo. “Set Me Free” is only held up by a repetitive “set me free” chant while encircling Martin Garrix’s synth explosions. Much of the disc’s second half hardly impresses like its front half: “I Can’t Take It” bends the vocals way too much; “Hurricane” borrows melodic riffs from Britney Spears’s “Till the World Ends,” although it gains points for finally dropping a succulent female voice (Lily Elise) on board the album.

Much of Money Sucks, Friends Rule works as an cautious introduction to Francis and what he’s capable of. A crash course of sorts; it doesn’t always sound great from start to finish. Sharpened a little, given more tracks like “Drunk All the Time” and maybe minus some of the lackadaisical tracks, this would have been a triumph of a debut disc.


About the Author

J Matthew Cobb

Managing editor of HiFi Magazine


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